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Friday, July 16

  1. page space.menu edited Home Oedipus Rex Keats's Poetry
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    Keats's Poetry

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    11:36 am

Tuesday, September 1

  1. page downy owl edited lgas;ldhgflkajshg .kasdaajsd gj dsgaf nsfjgfjg.dfjn dfflgndfg n;dfjlgn f;gjh;fjsgjsdfg sdjfjfdsf.g…
    lgas;ldhgflkajshg .kasdaajsd gj dsgaf nsfjgfjg.dfjn dfflgndfg n;dfjlgn f;gjh;fjsgjsdfg sdjfjfdsf.gs;dfghjdf;ghdfjbndfgjs;dfgh;sdfghdsfghj
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    8:59 am
  2. page Group 3 edited ... Make not your rosary of yew-berries, Nor let the beetle, nor the death-moth be ... Psyche,…
    ...
    Make not your rosary of yew-berries,
    Nor let the beetle, nor the death-moth be
    ...
    Psyche, nor thedownythe downy owl
    A partner in your sorrow's mysteries;
    For shade to shade will come too drowsily,
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    8:57 am
  3. page Group 3 edited ... Make not your rosary of yew-berries, Nor let the beetle, nor the death-moth be ... Psyche,…
    ...
    Make not your rosary of yew-berries,
    Nor let the beetle, nor the death-moth be
    ...
    Psyche, nor the downythedowny owl
    A partner in your sorrow's mysteries;
    For shade to shade will come too drowsily,
    (view changes)
    8:56 am

Wednesday, March 25

Saturday, January 24

  1. page home edited Welcome to Mr. Neal's Wiki for his English classes at the Frankfurt International School. ... mo…
    Welcome to Mr. Neal's Wiki for his English classes at the Frankfurt International School.
    ...
    more about Wiki’sWikis, and I know that the best
    ...
    assess your contributions toreflection on our use of Wiki’s.the Wiki. If you
    ...
    each other and me as resources. Use me as a resource. If you're
    ...
    a discussion question. Askquestion, or ask the person
    ...
    for help.
    Finally,

    Please
    remember that
    ...
    contribute. Finally, finallly, remember that
    Oedipus the King English A1 11 Project
    Keats's Poetry Project
    (view changes)
    10:39 pm

Friday, November 7

Wednesday, October 22

  1. page Group 4 edited ... Bloom, Harold. "Biography of John Keats." Bloom's Major Poets: John Keats (Jan. 2001…
    ...
    Bloom, Harold. "Biography of John Keats." Bloom's Major Poets: John Keats (Jan. 2001): 11-15. Literary Reference Center. EBSCO. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 9 Sep. 2008 <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=16524946&site=lrc-live>.
    Letters fr om: http://englishhistory.net/keats/letters.html
    ...
    the stone.
    Throughout

    Throughout
    his life,
    ...
    entire poem.
    Also

    Also
    Keats’ references
    ...
    brother’s death.
    Furthermore,

    Furthermore,
    in the
    ...
    to end.
    Another thing that shows Keats’ suffer is line 9 of stanza 3 “His soul shall taste the sadness…”. That line represents Keats himself who suffered throughout his whole life. His entire life was filled with losses, pain and sadness and the only thing that made him happy was his relationship with Fanny; however, that relationship didn’t last and Keats was alone – again! That loneliness and sadness is represented in that line and really helps the reader look right into Keats’ broken heart and soul.
    -Sara
    ...
    To bring attention to how great melancholy is.
    To glorify Melancholy.
    to get over his father's, mother's, grandmother's, ´grandfather's and brother's death
    to show that beauty and death connect

    Don't forget the link to "To Autumn" work
    (view changes)
    12:17 pm
  2. page Group 4 edited ... The greatest event in Keats’ life that had the most impact on “Ode on Melancholy” was his rela…
    ...
    The greatest event in Keats’ life that had the most impact on “Ode on Melancholy” was his relationship with Fanny Brawne. Keats and Fanny had a complicated relationship and Keats would feel torn by his love for her. Keats initially felt rebuffed by Fanny and in a letter to her who would write that “I have had a thousand kisses, for which with my whole soul I thank love - but if you should deny me the thousand and first - 't would put me to the proof how great a misery I could live through.” In another letter he writes that “I can do that no more - the pain would be too great - My Love is selfish - I cannot breathe without you.” He would also constantly feel perplexed by her and he could not understand her. Keats feelings for Fanny would constitute the main message of “Ode on Melancholy”. In the poem he writes that “She[Melancholy] dwells with Beauty - Beauty that must die;” and “Though seen of none save him whose strenuous tongue/Can burst Joy's grape against his palate fine;” These lines show hoe Melancholy lives with great beauty and one can only experience melancholy if one can “burst Joy's grape against his palate fine” i.e. experience great joy. This mirrors Keats feelings for Fanny, how his great love for her causes him great pain if he could not be with her. Thus, conversely, great pain cannot be experienced unless one has encountered great passion.
    Bloom, Harold. "Biography of John Keats." Bloom's Major Poets: John Keats (Jan. 2001): 11-15. Literary Reference Center. EBSCO. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 9 Sep. 2008 <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=16524946&site=lrc-live>.
    Letters from:fr om: http://englishhistory.net/keats/letters.html
    As a child, Keats lived a happy life until he was seven. That’s when his life made a u-turn and his troubles began. In 1804 his father died after falling from his horse and fracturing his skull. Only a year after his father’s death, his grandfather died. Then, in 1810, Keats’ mother died of tuberculosis and left her four children with their grandmother. When his grandmother died, Keats’ brother Tom started to show first signs of tuberculosis as well. Tom had moved in with Keats’ after their grandmother’s death and Keats had taken care of him from then on. Keats soon started to show signs of tuberculosis, too, and shortly after discovering that, in 1818, his brother Tom passed away. Keats then started an unhappy affair with his neighbour Fanny. He adored her but she seemed to do him more bad than good. Their relationship was destroyed when Keats began to show serious signs of tuberculosis in 1820. He died at the age of 25 in 1821 and his last wish was to be buried under a tombstone with: "Here lays One Whose Name was writ in Water" carved into its surface because he didn’t want his name to appear on the stone.
    ...
    entire poem.
    Also

    Also
    Keats’ references
    ...
    brother’s death.
    Furthermore,

    Furthermore,
    in the
    ...
    to end.
    Another thing that shows Keats’ suffer is line 9 of stanza 3 “His soul shall taste the sadness…”. That line represents Keats himself who suffered throughout his whole life. His entire life was filled with losses, pain and sadness and the only thing that made him happy was his relationship with Fanny; however, that relationship didn’t last and Keats was alone – again! That loneliness and sadness is represented in that line and really helps the reader look right into Keats’ broken heart and soul.
    -Sara
    ----------
    What are some of the purposes of this poem? Why did Keats write it in the first place? (Answers should be in bulleted lists, allowing others to "run" with their own ideas.)
    To highlight how one can only feel great passion/pleasure when one has felt great melancholy
    (view changes)
    12:14 pm
  3. page Group 4 edited ... Bloom, Harold. "Biography of John Keats." Bloom's Major Poets: John Keats (Jan. 2001…
    ...
    Bloom, Harold. "Biography of John Keats." Bloom's Major Poets: John Keats (Jan. 2001): 11-15. Literary Reference Center. EBSCO. [Library name], [City], [State abbreviation]. 9 Sep. 2008 <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=16524946&site=lrc-live>.
    Letters from: http://englishhistory.net/keats/letters.html
    As a child, Keats lived a happy life until he was seven. That’s when his life made a u-turn and his troubles began. In 1804 his father died after falling from his horse and fracturing his skull. Only a year after his father’s death, his grandfather died. Then, in 1810, Keats’ mother died of tuberculosis and left her four children with their grandmother. When his grandmother died, Keats’ brother Tom started to show first signs of tuberculosis as well. Tom had moved in with Keats’ after their grandmother’s death and Keats had taken care of him from then on. Keats soon started to show signs of tuberculosis, too, and shortly after discovering that, in 1818, his brother Tom passed away. Keats then started an unhappy affair with his neighbour Fanny. He adored her but she seemed to do him more bad than good. Their relationship was destroyed when Keats began to show serious signs of tuberculosis in 1820. He died at the age of 25 in 1821 and his last wish was to be buried under a tombstone with: "Here lays One Whose Name was writ in Water" carved into its surface because he didn’t want his name to appear on the stone.
    Throughout his life, Keats was confronted with death and misery. That influence also shows in “Ode on Melancholy”, where Keats repeatedly talks about the theme of death and poison. He already starts with the theme of death in line 1 “No, no, go not to Lethe…” which represents his parents and brother who all died when Keats was at a very young age. Lethe is a river in Hades from which the souls of the dead had to drink, in order to forget everything wrong they had done and suffered from when they were alive. That again refers to the theme of death which is strongly represented throughout the entire poem.
    Also Keats’ references to poisonous plants, such as Wolf’s-bane, nightshade, Proserpine, yew-berries and so on is important and highlights Keats’ strong connection to death and what happens after death. The plants could represent tuberculosis, which is a disease that caused Keats’ mother’s and brother’s death.
    Furthermore, in the last stanza in line 1, Keats again refers back to the main theme of death, by saying “…Beauty that must die”. His relationship with Fanny could be represented by “beauty”. Their relationship was not meant to be and failed and therefore the beauty had to “die” – the relationship had to end.
    Another thing that shows Keats’ suffer is line 9 of stanza 3 “His soul shall taste the sadness…”. That line represents Keats himself who suffered throughout his whole life. His entire life was filled with losses, pain and sadness and the only thing that made him happy was his relationship with Fanny; however, that relationship didn’t last and Keats was alone – again! That loneliness and sadness is represented in that line and really helps the reader look right into Keats’ broken heart and soul.
    -Sara
    ----------

    What are some of the purposes of this poem? Why did Keats write it in the first place? (Answers should be in bulleted lists, allowing others to "run" with their own ideas.)
    To highlight how one can only feel great passion/pleasure when one has felt great melancholy
    (view changes)
    12:08 pm

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